Getting Fit, Health Conditions
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The Best and Worst Exercises for Knee Pain

The Best and Worst Exercises for Knee Pain

Whether your knee problems because of aging, arthritis, genetics or sports injuries, learning how to take care of your knees is important. Living with knee pain can be a Catch-22. You have knee pain, so you don’t want to exercise. But without exercising, your pain and mobility won’t improve.

While it can be difficult to start an exercise routine, it’s important to stay active. Recent research shows that exercise is one of the key methods of treating knee pain without surgery and medications.

Here are some of the best and worst exercises you can do if you have bad knees.

BEST: Swimming

Swimming is a low-impact exercise that doesn’t put pressure on your knees. It works nearly every muscle in your body and can reduce joint stiffness, increase endurance and build muscle. Head to your local gym to get in some laps or take a water aerobics class.

WORST: Running

High impact exercises like running can be hard on the body because they put stress on the joints. Speed walking or swapping the elliptical instead of the treadmill can reduce impact during a good workout.

BEST: Tai Chi

Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese martial art that focuses on slow, rhythmic and meditative body movements. It can reduce pain and increase knee function, according to a medical study published by Tufts Medical Center.

WORST: Lunges

Lunges, an exercise where you step forward or backward and lower your hips to a 90-degree angle, can put stress on your knees, causing pain. Decrease your range of motion by doing a modification instead.

BEST: Calf and Leg Raises

Build strength in your lower body by doing calf and leg raises. For calf raises, use a chair or wall for balance as you lift your heels off the floor. To do a leg raise, put your back against a wall and slowly raise one leg 12 inches from the ground. Repeat with your other side.

WORST: Deep Squats

When you lower your body to perform a squat, your knees move forward, putting more pressure on your joints. If you experience pain, try a modified squat by lowering yourself onto a bench or chair instead.

How do you stay active with knee pain? Let us know by commenting below!

Consult your doctor before beginning any diet or exercise program.

Deborah Abrams Kaplan

Deborah Abrams Kaplan is a health and medical writer who works at a standing desk. She believes that everyone should take charge of their own healthcare and not be afraid to ask questions. She hopes that her writing empowers people to do that. You can see more of Deborah’s work on her website, and follow her on Twitter @friscokids.

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Deborah Abrams Kaplan is a health and medical writer who works at a standing desk. She believes that everyone should take charge of their own healthcare and not be afraid to ask questions. She hopes that her writing empowers people to do that. You can see more of Deborah’s work on her website, and follow her on Twitter @friscokids.

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